postpartum

What is Prolapse?!

Prolapse is the descent of the pelvic organs towards the vaginal opening. Along with other pelvic floor dysfunctions, prolapse can be scary and uncomfortable to talk but it shouldn’t be. There are several different types of Prolapse and different degrees- ranging from 0 to 4. Some of the signs and symptoms to look for are:

·      Pressure

·      Heaviness in the vagina

·      Excess tissue or a bulge

·      Leaking of bodily fluids

·      Inability to retain a tampon

·      Pain

The first thing you should do if you think you may have a prolapse is to NOT resort to doctor google, but to seek out a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist for an assessment- Find one here. Second step is to find a Pregnancy and Postpartum Athleticism Coach in your area- find one here. If there isn’t a coach in your area reach out, I offer 1-on-1 coaching and group coaching remotely.

Having a prolapse isn’t black and white and there is no such thing as “safe” and “unsafe” exercises for prolapse or any other pelvic floor dysfunction. With the help of a physical therapist and a fitness coach with continuing education working with these types of symptoms can help you build strength, awareness, confidence, hope, longevity, and so much more! If you’ve been told you can never lift heavy weights again or you should never run again get a second or even third opinion. The end goal is to get you to a place where you know how to monitor and manage your symptoms and do the things that make you happy.

 

When should you stop doing overhead movements during pregnancy and when can you add them back in postpartum?

There is no hard timeline- Do you have a strategy in place that will support the task symptom free? I sound like a broken record, but every woman’s journey is different. Dialing in your breathing and body alignment is key during this chapter. You already have a growing baby adding additional weight and tension to your midline and pelvic floor. Let’s not add to it by putting additional weight and pressure on those areas when it’s not needed. And is it really worth the risk? Working with me during your pregnancy to dial in strategies will help set-up you for your postpartum chapter.

Signs to look for

  • Coning/doming/tugging/pulling of the midline

  • Ribs flaring up- Causing additional pressure on the midline

  • Pelvic pain/pressure

  • Leaking urine

  • Diastasis Recti/Healing DR Postpartum

Scaling options for overhead movements

  • Floor press

  • Seated overhead press- monitoring your alignment

  • Incline push-ups

  • Static overhead holds- again monitoring your alignment

Coaching reminders

  • Ribs stacked over hips, weight midfoot, butt untucked

  •  Breathing option 1- Inhale (relax) then start your exhale (lift &engage), as you continue to exhale (lift &engage) through the full range of motion.

  • Breathing option 2- Inhale at the start of the movement (relax), then exhale through the hard part of the movement (lift &engage).

Together we’ll work on YOUR timeline to keep you working out safely during and after pregnancy.

-Coach K

Time is on your side

Our baby turned 1 this month! Her first year of life has been one heck of a ride. There were more breakdowns than I can count & so many “I don’t know WTH I am doing” moments but guess what?! WE survived!

At 1 year postpartum, Do I feel like my “pre-baby” body is back? No. Is that a bad thing? Of course not. I have my body that has gone through change. I am slowly building up my strength, endurance, and most of all my confidence inside & outside the gym. I didn’t give myself a strict timeline of when I was going to do certain movements (everyone’s timeline will be different). There were a few things I waited to add in (running, jumping, midline exercises, etc). For the most part, I went off of how I was feeling that day (sleep deprived? Fatigued? Un-motivated?) and if I could do the movement with a strategy that was going to support the task. Yes, there were times when I was frustrated & felt like I wasn’t progressing. The first 6 months felt like years to me and I just wanted to be myself again and do whatever I wanted to in the gym. It wasn’t until about 4 months postpartum that things started to click for me & my point of view changed. If I could go back and tell my newly postpartum self to slow down and take it all in…. I would

Now, that a year has come and gone, I find myself happy and sad at the same time. I’m happy that Saylor is happy and healthy after 1 year, but I’m missing the late night snuggles and naps on my chest. People like to hand out their advice often to pregnant & postpartum moms, so I’ll just add to it

Try to be patient, bond with your baby, trust the process, & your body. Time is on your side for recovery, even if you think it’s not. Slow down, enjoy the journey. Before you know it this time will be gone.

 

-Coach K 

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Scaling Tips During Pregnancy & Postpartum

While going through my own pregnancy and postpartum journey, I quickly realized how much information was out there around fitness for expecting and new moms. After furthering my education and becoming a Pregnancy & Postpartum Athleticism coach I’ve gained a whole new mindset on what matters most during this stage of life; safely training during pregnancy, mindset, strategy, and preparing your body for the postpartum journey.  I often tell my Moms in Training, “Train to train another day!” What are you gaining from doing pull-ups at 30-weeks pregnant? A coning abdomen and a more significant separation of the midline postpartum? Maybe, maybe not, but it’s not worth the risk.

There are numerous scaling modifications for the movements we do inside the gym, at our home gyms, and in our everyday life. The questions I get asked the most are when to scale barbell movements, pull-ups, and loading? I wish there were an exact answer I could give, but every woman and pregnancy are different.

I’ve put together some questions you can ask yourself that help you know when it’s time to start scaling the above movements. Please understand that these are just a few of the possible signs and you should always consult with your doctor.

Barbell movements:

During my own workout, I am constantly working on making my bar path better, but once my belly started to grow I hung up the barbell and got comfy with dumbbells and a kettlebell. I found that by compensating for a growing belly I was beginning to develop bad habits and It wasn’t worth the risk for me.

  • Has your baby made enough gains to throw off your bar path in a snatch?
  • Are you hitting your belly with the barbell? (Obviously, one I know! ☺)
  • Do you compensate form and pull the bar around your belly?
  • Do you feel pain, discomfort, pressure, or feel heaviness in the pelvis?
  • Are you leaking urine?

Pull-ups:

Pull-ups can put stress on your mid-section. How much is too much?

  • Is your belly coning or does it have a doming shape during pull-ups?
  • Do you feel a pulling, stretching, or ripping sensation in the midline?

Overhead barbell movements:

Overhead movements can also put stress on a prenatal or postpartum woman. Make sure you're not ignoring any of these signs.

  • Is your belly coning or does it have a doming shape when putting a barbell overhead?
  • Do you feel a tugging or pulling sensation of the midline?
  • Is your rib cage flared up/overextended?
  • Do you feel pain, discomfort, pressure, or heaviness in the pelvis?
  • Are you leaking urine?

My goal is to help as many moms as possible with their journey. I’m super excited to be partnered with SugarWOD to Train, Educate & Empower MOMS everywhere! If you would like more guidance for your own journey, please reach out I’d be happy to help you!

-Coach Kaylee

If you’re a pregnant woman or a coach training pregnant women, check out Moms In Training for programming resources for pregnant women.